Molecular data storage could soon be achievable

Study provides proof-of-concept for high-density data storage technology 

Researchers at Manchester University have provided proof-of-concept that molecular data storage could be achievable in the near future. As the amount of data we produce continues to grow, the space it occupies in storage becomes an issue; it is estimated that molecular technologies could store more than 200 terabits of data per square inch – that’s 25,000 GB of information in something the size of a 50p coin. Researchers at Manchester University have provided proof-of-concept that molecular data storage could be achievable in the near future
 
In a paper published in Nature, scientists showed that they had performed a process called magnetic hysteresis, a memory effect that is a prerequisite of any data storage, in an individual molecule at -213˚C. This temperature, which is considerably higher than previous attempts, means the technology could become a reality because the molecules could be cooled by cheap liquid nitrogen (-196 ˚C) , instead of expensive liquid helium (-269 ˚C).  
 
One of the authors of the study Dr. Nicholas Chilton explained the impact of the research, saying, “this is very exciting as magnetic hysteresis in single molecules implies the ability for binary data storage. Using single molecules for data storage could theoretically give 100 times higher data density than current technologies. Here we are approaching the temperature of liquid nitrogen, which would mean data storage in single molecules becomes much more viable from an economic point of view.”
Read more on this story at The University of Manchester website
 
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